Monday, May 9, 2016

The latest show from radio Free Amsterdam

George Clinton lays it all down (Interview with Detroit Metro Times)


George Clinton lays it all down. 

Uncle Jam still wants you By Shelley Salant

CLIP:
...
MT: Do you have any memories of favorite places to hang out in Detroit in the '60s and '70s? 
Clinton: Oh, all over the place, from the Grande Ballroom, the 20 Grand, all the way over to Eastland. When we first started with Parliament, at 876 Woodward, we used to play every weekend at the union hall. All the clubs, we played. Then over in Windsor, we'd play all the time, you know, CKLW. 
MT: Did you play with the MC5 or the Stooges? 
Clinton: Oh, we played with them all the time. They were called the "bad boys of Ann Arbor." John Sinclair, we used to play out in the park to get him out of jail for the week. 
MT: Did you feel like those bands influenced the Funkadelic direction? 
Clinton: We came out as a doo-wop group, a singing group. We saw that Detroit had its own version of rock 'n' roll coming out. They influenced us a lot. We was changing from Parliament to Funkadelic, and it would've been Iggy Pop (who) had a lot to do with that. That craziness. I saw how far you could go and still entertain people. We had the same management agency, Diversified Management. All of us had the same agent: Amboy Dukes, Ted Nugent, MC5, Silver Bullet with Bob Seger, all of us. 
http://www.metrotimes.com/detroit/george-clinton-lays-it-all-down/Content?oid=2441830


FATTENING BLOGS FOR SNAKES 2016

"Fess" Frolics One More Time


"Fess" Frolics One More Time 

BY GEORGE DE STEFANO6 May 2016. 
Henry Roeland Byrd, the New Orleans pianist known to the world as Professor Longhair, has been dead for 35 years. But he’s by no means forgotten. At the recently concluded (and rain-sodden) Jazz and Heritage Festival, there he was above the Arcura stage—or rather, an image of him seated at a horseshoe-shaped keyboard—looking down on the crowd like a presiding spirit or deity. 
His career had more downs than ups, he suffered from poor health and poverty, and his overdue comeback starting in the late ‘70s was cruelly cut short by his premature death. But “Fess”, as friends and fans affectionately called him, continues to inspire musicians—and not only in New Orleans—and delight listeners. His unique style, compounded from the blues, boogie-woogie, and Cuban rhumba and habanera, doesn’t just make you feel good; it arouses joy. Even when the Professor is playing the blues, there’s an irrepressible sense of pleasure and enjoyment.
As his friend, student, and musical partner Dr. John put it, “Professor Longhair was the guardian angel of the roots of New Orleans music. He was a one-of-a- kind musician and man, and he defined a certain style of rhumba-boogie funk that was New Orleans R&B from the late 1950s all the way through to his death in 1980. All New Orleans pianists today owe Fess. He was the guru, godfather, and spiritual root doctor of all that came under him.” 
Born in Bogalusa, Louisiana in 1918, Byrd and his family moved from that Klan-dominated city to New Orleans when he was a child. A self-taught pianist, he didn’t read music but boasted a great ear and formidable keyboard chops. (He learned to play on a discarded old piano that was missing several keys.) He began his recording career in the late ‘40s/early ‘50s heyday of New Orleans rhythm and blues, making local hits like “Bald Head” and “Mardi Gras in New Orleans” (the latter now can be heard in a Subaru TV commercial). In the early years, he recorded for several labels, under different names—Roy “Bald Head” Byrd, Professor Longhair and His Shuffling Hungarians, Professor Longhair and His Blues Scholars—which limited his prospects for wider recognition, as did his reluctance to leave his hometown to tour. His discography isn’t ample, comprising a few studio albums, several live recordings, and many compilations of varying quality. So the release of Live in Chicago, a seven-song set recorded at the 1976 Chicago Folk Festival, is a very welcome addition to his catalog.

Fess fans can thank two people for this unexpected gift: Carlo Ditta, the producer who released it on Orleans Records, an independent label specializing in New Orleans R&B and related styles, and guitarist Billy Gregory, who played with Fess on the Chicago date. Gregory mixed the original tape that was broadcast on Chicago radio and held on to it for some 25 years before he brought it to Ditta.

Gregory and Ditta have quite a bit of history between them. They’ve known each other since they were teenagers in the late ‘60s, the older Gregory having been a local hero who played in Nectar, a New Orleans band that opened for the Jefferson Airplane when they played the Crescent City. Gregory relocated to San Francisco, where in 1971 he joined It’s a Beautiful Day, an adventurous band whose eclectic style blended jazz, folk, rock, and classical. Gregory performed and recorded with them until 1974, when he returned to New Orleans and became Professor Longhair’s lead guitarist. Ditta, also a guitarist, would go to the 501 Club—later renamed Tipitina’s, after one of Professor Longhair’s most famous tunes— to catch the band and its “guitar-slinging hippie”.

Flash forward 40 years to a very different New Orleans music scene, where Gregory is a familiar presence in Bourbon Street and Frenchmen Street clubs and Ditta a producer, recording artist, and gigging musician who frequently performs with the radical poet John Sinclair. How serendipitous, and fitting, that the guitarist who played in Fess’s band and the fan who turned up at their gigs would reunite for Live in Chicago. 
Ditta and Gregory mastered and produced the album (which is available in CD and on vinyl) from the original analog tape. They’ve done a great job—the mix is bright, clear, and well-balanced. Fess’s piano and vocals are up front (as they should be), but Gregory’s quicksilver, often dazzling solos, as well as his comping, come through strongly. Rhythm guitarist Will Harvey and bassist Julius Farmer (veterans of earlier Professor Longhair bands) and drummer Earl Gordon round out the quintet. This is one of Fess’s smaller ensembles—no horns or additional percussion— and the stripped down format is just right. Who needs saxophone solos or conga beats when you’ve got Professor Longhair and his hotshot guitarist Gregory romping through classics like “Big Chief”, “Mardi Gras in New Orleans”, and “Mess Around”? READ MORE HERE
http://www.popmatters.com/review/professor-longhair-live-in-chicago/

FATTENING BLOGS FOR SNAKES 2016

Saturday, April 30, 2016

John Sinclair and Cary Loren at the Horse Hospital, London







I was fortunate to fly down London to see John and Cary at the Horse Hospital, for their combined 'Detroit Artists Workshop' exhibition. I snapped a few pics, below, but if you have the chance, get down and experience the work for yourself.

The work box, assembled by Cary Loren features flyers, posters, poems and photos, many of which make up the display. I Had fun, thanks guys, steve fly.




 







FATTENING BLOGS FOR SNAKES 2016

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Latest Shows From Radio Free Amsterdam


http://www.radiofreeamsterdam.com/




  • The Blues Show: Flying Home

    The Blues Show: Flying Home

    Bruce Pingree is playing new blues recordings by Andy T & the Nick Nixon Band, Shemekia Copeland, Tommy Castro &...
  • John Sinclair Radio Show: Out Come The Freaks (Again)

    John Sinclair Radio Show: Out Come The Freaks (Again)

    Episode 647 is coming from the Blind Pig CafĂ© in downtown Ann Arbor where I’m appearing tonight as part of...
  • Jazz Lunatique: Cut And Run

    Jazz Lunatique: Cut And Run

    David Kunian is adding his twisted perspecctive to the WWOZ fund drive with this program of musical outness featuring music...
  • Jazz From The Hempshopper: Boogie Stop Shuffle

    Jazz From The Hempshopper: Boogie Stop Shuffle

    Episode 58 was beamed out from the Hempshopper store on the Singel canal in Amsterdam in the summer of 2011...
  • Red Rooster Lounge: Tee Nah Nah

    Red Rooster Lounge: Tee Nah Nah

    Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by Billy  Branch & Living History Band,...
  • Diggin’ The Roots: Throwin’ The Horns

    Diggin’ The Roots: Throwin’ The Horns

    Tom Morgan is Diggin’ The Roots for Radio Free Amsterdam featuring music from New Orleans originally broadcast in January 2008...
  • Homage To Steve Mackay (Part 1)

    Homage To Steve Mackay (Part 1)

    Dominic Trix of KFJC-FM at Foothiils College in Palo Alto Hills CA brought in my old friends Dan Gunning (of...
  • Fly By Night: Miles Magus

    Fly By Night: Miles Magus

    Steve The Fly is spending this hour with the great Miles Davis, playing selections from The Unique Miles Davis, Filles...
  • Beyond The Groove Yard: Sombrero Sam

    Beyond The Groove Yard: Sombrero Sam

    Episode 87 has George Klein featuring one set each by Charles Lloyd playing flute with his own band and with...
  • Beyond The Groove Yard: The Lamp Is Low

    Beyond The Groove Yard: The Lamp Is Low

    George Klein is back with three more tenors: One set each for sessions led by saxophonists Booker Ervin, Hank Mobley,...
  • Messin’ With The Blues: Servant’s Prayer

    Messin’ With The Blues: Servant’s Prayer

    Leslie Keros has a mess of great music in Episode 76 with tunes by the Texas Horns, Reverend Raven &...
  • Chicago Bound: Wang Dang Doodle

    Chicago Bound: Wang Dang Doodle

    Leslie Keros has got the blues from Chicago in Episode 76 wu=ith great cuts by James Cotton, George “Mojo” Buford,...
  • The Blues Show: King Of The Guitar

    The Blues Show: King Of The Guitar

    Bruce Pingree is playing music by guitarist, singer & composer Ruthie Foster in advance of her New Hampshire appearance the...
  • John Sinclair Radio Show: Wheel Me Out

    John Sinclair Radio Show: Wheel Me Out

    Episode 646 is coming from my daughter Sunny’s place off of 8 Mile Road in Detroit where I’ll be for...
  • Jazz Lunatique: Shoo Fly

    Jazz Lunatique: Shoo Fly

    David Kunian is playing Wild Indian music on the week before Mardi Gras with tunes by Big Chief Peppy with...
  • Jazz From The Hempshopper: The Wailer

    Jazz From The Hempshopper: The Wailer

    This week’s episode of Jazz from the Hempshopper with John Sinclair is beaming out from the Hempshopper store on the...
  • Red Rooster Lounge: Drawers Trouble

    Red Rooster Lounge: Drawers Trouble

    Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by Reginald Cooper, Rusty Zinn, James Brown,...
  • Diggin’ The Roots: Ball The Wall

    Diggin’ The Roots: Ball The Wall

    Tom Morgan is Diggin’ The Roots for Radio Free Amsterdam featuring New Orleans pianists on New Year’s Day in 2008...
  • The Soul Lucille Show: Goose Bumps

    The Soul Lucille Show: Goose Bumps

    Lucille DJ is on the air from controradio in the heart of Italy with a killer hour of soul &...
  • Fly By Night: Numbers Game

    Fly By Night: Numbers Game

    Steve The Fly is spinning another hour of live cuts from the Fly Agaric vaults by the Alan Hertz band.
  • Beyond The Groove Yard: Time Was

    Beyond The Groove Yard: Time Was

    George Klein is limning mini-profiles of three tenor saxophonists in Episode 85: One set each for sessions led by John..


    FATTENING BLOGS FOR SNAKES 2016